past misconceptions about music

what are things you thought in the past that turned out to be completely wrong?
for me:
I thought in the past that there would be special wah wah guitars that can produce this wah wah sound, I never thought that it might be actually just an effect pedal.
I remember how I talked in the past about how I want a wah wah guitar.

6 Likes

I wondered for a while what made that compressed air being released sound… turns out it was just a china cymbal .-------------.

4 Likes

I hated Nu-Metal for a long time, because I didn’t think chugging chords was heavy. I found some good Nu-Metal bands in Visual Kei, and it made me realize that Nu-Metal actually had a good scene beyond the mainstream crap they force feed us.

2 Likes

I thought gitarists always play on all strings

3 Likes

Specifically about mixing, but I used to think the goal of a good mix was to have every element clearly audible in the music.

Then I went to audio school and did some continuing education stuff in the field of audio engineering, and I learned that that’s not at all true. Some elements you don’t want to hear, just feel (like a tambourine playing steady 16th notes SUPER QUIETLY in the background, gently propelling the momentum of a song forward, while the drummer plays quarter notes on the cymbals). Some elements you don’t want to hear CLEARLY, but rather hear how they blend in with other elements and how those things compliment each other (like the relationships between kick drum and bass guitar, and bass guitar and regular guitar).

Audio engineering is basically playing around with a jigsaw puzzle of sound.

4 Likes

ohhh it’s probably the expectation of talent and skillsmanship that has to define how many octaves your fav frontman has to pull live to be considered legit, or how many dozens of strings they have to screw on their bass etc

real life is kinda different and very no pressure, if u want to spend a day jamming to cross maria who can stop you? if your earussy is lusting for deviloof, why would u suppress those cravings? sukekiyo stans are valid af!! yumeleep fans must be protected.

8 Likes

What I used to think was pretty anemic-sounding audio just was the fact that I was listening through neutral headphones, and I actually preferred a V-shaped sound signature. I mainly use or EQ to U-shaped, since I tend to like a bit more forward mid-range nowadays.

Some elements you don’t want to hear, just feel (like a tambourine playing steady 16th notes SUPER QUIETLY in the background, gently propelling the momentum of a song forward, while the drummer plays quarter notes on the cymbals). Some elements you don’t want to hear CLEARLY, but rather hear how they blend in with other elements and how those things complement each other (like the relationships between kick drum and bass guitar, and bass guitar and regular guitar).

In a similar vein to that, I used to think that soundstage width and instrument separation (and the type of tuning that facilitates that) = better. While that might benefit something like a live-recording, cohesion is just as, if not more important as an element to the overall sound. I’ve found that really apparent listening to old recordings being Dolby Atmos -ified and sounding absolutely dreadful. Where I used to undervalue imaging accuracy, I find a lot more valuable nowadays (over sheer soundstage width & depth.)


Leaning more music (less audio stuff), I used to write off a lot of songs as “shit” for being really derivative or not being up to whatever “melodic” standards I had. Once I actually researched and traced the cultural roots and the type of “derivations” taking place, it became more apparent that it was just a different way of doing things. For some genres it’s a matter of respect to the greats, a nod to a previous creator. I used to think music that utilized plunderphonics was plagiaristic, but there’s a lot more thought put in than one might think (ex. Dub’s relation to Reggae or Vaporwave’s to 80’s Hits).

2 Likes

The only thing I can think of atm is the time when I passionately hated rap music in middle school. Now in the present day after actually listening to more than what the mainstream shoves down our throats, I’ve grown to appreciate it as there are some cutthroat lyrics out there performed by those who are actually musically inclined and write their own stuff rather than regurgitating the same garbage written by one producer.

1 Like

I used to hate rap too b/c I was more of an R&B guy + constantly inundated with mid-to-late 00’s hip-hop club hits that were always hyper-sexualized and lyrically trash. I liked Nas and Tupac for the samples, but I didn’t get really into the genre lyrically until I listened to Immortal Technique - Dance With The Devil which has absolutely amazing storytelling. Nowadays, I know where to look for artists I actually like lyrically and flow-wise.

To add to that, one misconception I outgrew many years ago was feeling gated out of certain genres b/c I didn’t vibe with their more popular artists. Everything is connected and there’s always a way in, and it’s a wonderful feeling when I find my gateway artist, because I know there’s much ahead (thanks to platforms like last.fm, YouTube, and Spotify w/ their info/algorithms.)

3 Likes

:point_up_2: this… exactly this :joy:

2 Likes